Drug users, advocates fear federal election may sideline safer opioids policy

Camille Bains, The Canadian Press

Published Thursday, February 14, 2019

The co-founder of a national group of parents whose children have died of overdoses fears the looming federal election will derail any policy changes that could make a safer supply of opioids a priority, even as the country's chief public health officer has promised to review such a plan.

Leslie McBain of Moms Stop the Harm said the overemphasis on addiction treatment has not worked because drug users are continuing to use the black market to access fentanyl-laced substances that have killed thousands of Canadians.

"In implementing a safe supply (policy), it brings the people who need it into an environment where they can then also be offered different forms of treatment. It keeps them alive. It takes courage to make that step to recovery," said McBain, whose 25-year-old son fatally overdosed five years ago.

"I think the federal government is trying to do the right thing but in an election year the Liberals don't want to do anything that might further impact their base."

McBain, who advocates for families with the BC Centre on Substance Use, said Health Canada needs to provide the public with information about the process involved in a safer-opioids review by Canada's chief public health officer, Dr. Theresa Tam, who announced in December she will gather data from provinces and territories.

"We are committed to exploring additional options for creating the conditions for a safer supply of opioids," the agency said in a statement, adding its work is "ongoing."

Drug users, advocates fear federal election may sideline safer opioids policy