Alberta mom adds voice to MomsStopTheHarm campaign

CTV Alberta Prime Time, December 18, 2017

A network of Canadian families, whose loved ones have died due to substance use, has sent hundreds of photos and stories to the prime minister’s office in hopes of invoking an emotional response to the opioid crisis.

By sending the photos, Moms Stop the Harm was hoping to put a face to the significant number of people who have died in Canada as a result of the opioid crisis.

The group is getting frustrated with a lack of a direct response from the PM.

Alberta mom adds voice to MomsStopTheHarm campaign

Calgary non-profit offers free naloxone clinics to fight stigma of drug addiction

CBC News December 18, 2017

Davis started the group shortly after her 34-year-old partner, Nathan Huggins-Rosenthal, died of a fentanyl overdose in 2015.

Her passion is to change people's attitudes about addiction and treat people who are dealing with it with compassion.

The group is now partnering with Safeworks, a needle distribution program through Alberta Health Services that aims to educate people about opioids, who is using them and how to help.

"There is so much shame and stigma that comes with addiction that it can be really hard for families to speak out and to tell their story," Davis told CBC News.

Calgary non-profit offers free naloxone clinics to fight stigma of drug addiction

Doctors urged to learn to treat opioid addiction, not shun patients

Globe and Mail, December 14, 2917

Leslie McBain said her son, Jordan Miller, feared he'd become dependent on oxycodone that was prescribed for a back injury and sought help. McBain accompanied him to see a doctor, who she said unleashed a torrent of anger when the issue of addiction came up.

"The doctor blew up," said McBain, a founding member of a group called Moms Stop the Harm, which supports about 300 families across Canada as they deal with the death of a loved one who has overdosed.

"I've never seen a professional person lose their temper like that. It was ugly. I was just sitting on the sidelines in the office and I thought, 'My son came in here with his courage in his hand to say I need help and the doctor's yelling at him.' "

Doctors urged to learn to treat opioid addiction, not shun patients

Drug User Groups and Community Resilience

Mike Ma, Social Justice Centre, December 7, 2017

Yesterday I attended a powerful event in Abbotsford organized around the issue of drug user empowerment, the challenge of stigma, and stigma causing practices. The event was titled “Drug User Groups and Community Resilience”.

It was an event organized by Ann Livingston and Erika Thomson and supported by a wide variety of organizations that included MSTH.

Drug User Groups and Community Resilience

Pot in B.C. to be sold in public and private stores; minimum age to buy and use is 19

Kamloops This Week, December 5, 2017

Sandra Tully of Moms Stop the Harm forwarded an email to KTW from the organization with its reaction to the government’s announcement.

The group said it supports “legalization from a harm-reduction perspective.

“The current unregulated illegal market is far more dangerous for users and especially young people than a government-regulated market will be. Dealers do not check your ID. We support measures that reduce the likelihood of youths and young people to use cannabis and we ask that tax dollars generated from cannabis sales are invested in education, prevention and harm reduction.”

Tully’s son Ryan Pinneo died from a fentanyl overdose last year.

Pot in B.C. to be sold in public and private stores; minimum age to buy and use is 19

Families slam what they call Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s lack of response to opioid crisis

Global News Edmonton November 28, 2017

A network of Canadian families, whose loved ones have died due to substance use, has sent hundreds of photos and stories to the prime minister’s office in hopes of invoking an emotional response to the opioid crisis.

By sending the photos, Moms Stop the Harm was hoping to put a face to the significant number of people who have died in Canada as a result of the opioid crisis. “I don’t know if he cares about our children,” the project’s co-founder, Petra Schulz, told Global News.

Families slam what they call Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s lack of response to opioid crisis

 

Shatter The Stigma – Let’s Talk Drugs: Part 4

Winnipeg Sun, November 28, 2017

Adam tried a methadone program, he attempted to detox at the Main Street Project, he saw family physicians, he ended up in emergency four times in the throes of withdrawal, and he met with a counsellor at the Addictions Foundation of Manitoba (AFM). None of the treatment options or resources gave Adam the support he needed. He died alone in the basement of his parents’ Riverview home from an accidental fentanyl poisoning on February 6, 2016, at age 27. His brother found him and had to break the news to his parents, Christine Dobbs and Lang Watson, who were on vacation.

Shatter The Stigma – Let’s Talk Drugs: Part 4

Shatter the Stigma - Let's Talk Drugs: Part 2

Winnipeg Sun, November 26, 2017

What becomes of the broken-hearted mothers who have lost their children to addiction? Many seek out others who have suffered the same loss. Fridfinnson has drawn strength from women she met through Moms Stop the Harm (MSTH).

MSTH is a network of Canadian mothers and families whose loved ones have died due to substance use or hope for recovery. Their mandate is to call for an end to the failed war on drugs and to focus on a new to shatter the stigma associated with opioid addiction through educating the public.

Shatter the Stigma - Let's Talk Drugs: Part 2

Shatter the Stigma - Let's Talk Drugs: Part 1

Winnipeg Sun, November 25, 2017

If there’s one thing his parents, MSTH Arlene Last-Kolb and John Kolb, have learned about opioid addiction is that it can happen to anyone and all the preconceived notions some people have about opioid addiction just perpetuate the stigma.

“If it can happen to him, it can happen to anyone,” said Last-Kolb who knew next to nothing about fentanyl when her son accidentally overdosed on July 18, 2014, at the age of 24.

Shatter the Stigma - Let's Talk Drugs: Part 1

St. Albert mom bringing attention to opioid crisis

St. Albert Gazette, November 17, 2017

A St. Albert mother is helping to flood the prime minister’s mailbox with messages and photos of loved ones lost to opioids.

Faye Gray and her family and friends are sending about 20 envelopes containing photos and stories of their lost loved ones to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to urge him to do more about the fentanyl crisis in the country.

“It was hard to do. There was lots of crying,” Gray said about gathering the photos and stories.

St. Albert mom bringing attention to opioid crisis

Families mail photos of opioid victims to prime minister

Calgary Herald, November 16, 2017

Schulz, co-founder of advocacy group Moms Stop the Harm, is organizing a campaign to flood the prime minister’s office with hundreds of photographs of victims of the opioid crisis to mark National Addiction Awareness Week.

“We want him to shed a tear for our kids and we think these photos can do it,”

From left; Rosalind Davis, Petra Schulz, Leslie McBain and Donna May have all lost loved ones to the opioid crisis. On Tuesday they were joining hundreds of families across Canada sending photos of their loved ones with messages to the Prime Minister. The four gathered at an opioid conference as part of national addiction awareness week at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Calgary.

Families mail photos of opioid victims to prime minister

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Taking her message to the top

Winnipeg Sun, November 13, 2017

A Winnipeg woman who has become a vocal advocate in the fight against opioids wants her son’s story seen by the highest office in the land.

Arlene Last-Kolb, whose son Jesse died in 2014 of a fentanyl overdose, sent 160 individual envelopes containing a letter and a photo of her son to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s office, an act she said will honour her child while keeping the stories of families impacted by opioid overdoses front and centre.

Last-Kolb said she settled on 160 to represent the number of people on average who are impacted when someone dies. The initiative was spearheaded by a group called Moms Stop The Harm, a Canadian grassroots organization that raises awareness of addictions issues.

Taking her message to the top

Families of overdose victims hope to catch Prime Minister's attention

CFJC Kamloops Today, November 16, 2017

The office of the Prime Minister will be receiving plenty of mail in the days to come, as families of overdose victims send pictures of their loved ones.

The campaign, which began Monday, was created by Moms Stop the Harm, a network of Canadian families who have lost family members to substance use.

"We've asked everyone to write the birth date and the passing date, what the cause of death was," Tully said. "I no longer refer to Ryan's death as an overdose, I refer to it as a fentanyl poisoning, because truly that's what it was. Language really matters when we're talking about this crisis, so we need to get that right as well. And I wrote on my photo descriptive words of Ryan, of how I felt about Ryan, and then I wrote, 'how many more deaths does it take?'".

Families of overdose victims hope to catch Prime Minister's attention

Alberta group helps families affected by opioid crisis send photos of loved ones to prime minister

Metro News Calgary, November 14, 2017

Advocates and families affected by Canada's growing opioid crisis are launching a letter-writing campaign this week to pressure the federal government to take action – but instead of words, they’re using photographs to convey their message.

The 'Do Something Prime Minister Photo Campaign', organized by Moms Stop the Harm (MSTH) and the Alberta Foundation for Changing the Face of Addiction (AFCFA), is encouraging families to send photos of their loved ones who have died from opioid-related causes or who are seeking recovery from substance use to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s office in Ottawa.

“We need to see leadership at the top, starting with our prime minister,” said Petra Schulz, a co-founder of MSTH.

Alberta group helps families affected by opioid crisis send photos of loved ones to prime minister