'If it hasn't happened ... it's coming': Mothers urge radical approach to fentanyl crisis

CBC News November 9, 2017

"If it hasn't happened in your family ... either you're in denial or it's coming."

She says her experiences have turned her into a radical — one of four middle-aged moms, kind and candid, who are now advocating for something they say will save lives but is contentious: make drugs such as cocaine and heroin legal and having them inspected and sold by the government.

Their argument is pretty simple: the power of addiction combined with the prevalence of fentanyl is killing hundreds of people who, despite the risks, won't stop doing drugs. Taking those drugs out of the hands of criminal dealers and having the government control the supply could save many of those lives, they say.

'If it hasn't happened ... it's coming': Mothers urge radical approach to fentanyl crisis

Alberta approves pilot programs for injectable opioid therapy

Edmonton Journal, November 2, 2017

Albertans who have struggled with traditional forms of opioid treatment such as suboxone and methadone could soon have access to an injectable form of therapy.

These are recommendations from the Ministers Opioid Emergency Response Commission that Petra Schulz is a member of.

Alberta approves pilot programs for injectable opioid therapy

Tuesday's letters: MP misses point of safe injection sites

Edmonton Journal October 31, 2017

Supervised consumption services (SCS) primarily save lives, and anyone who has lost a loved one can tell you how important that is. We need to reduce stigma, provide good drug safety information and bring harm reduction, including needle exchanges, Naloxone distribution and opioid dependency treatment, closer to them in primary care. How we can make this happen should have been the topic of discussion.

Tuesday's letters: MP misses point of safe injection sites

Drug company ponders new branding on controversial opioid pills

The Star, October 30, 2017

The federal government is just “grasping at low hanging fruit” by asking the company only to consider changing the name, said Amy Graves, founder of the non-profit Get Prescription Drugs off the Street. Graves also warned that just changing the pill’s markings in isolation could cause unintended consequences.

Drug company ponders new branding on controversial opioid pills

Police warn more potentially lethal Halloween-stamped fentanyl blotters could be in Winnipeg

CBC News Manitoba, October 29, 2017

Petra Schulz, a co-founder of Moms Stop The Harm, said it's difficult for users to know the concentration of their drugs when they're packaged in blotters. "Every time when there are changes in the format of how something is presented, people are just at a much greater risk of overdose," she said.

Schulz said this type of packaging makes the drugs more attractive to users, especially for people "who haven't tried it out." Don't use drugs alone. Recognise the signs of an overdose. Carry Naloxone.

Police warn more potentially lethal Halloween-stamped fentanyl blotters could be in Winnipeg

Ottawa approves supervised drug consumption site for Calgary's Sheldon Chumir centre

CBC Calgary, October 27, 2018

Jessica Holtsbaum with Changing the Face of Addiction called the new site a long-overdue step in the right direction. "This is great news. We feel this site will have a positive impact on the community. It will save lives and provide those with substance-use disorders an access point to further treatment," she said in a release.

Ottawa approves supervised drug consumption site for Calgary's Sheldon Chumir centre

Opinion: Science should guide local response to substance abuse

Elaine Hyska and Cameron Wild, October 23, 2017. Emonton Journal Opinion.

Last week, Health Canada issued the approvals to establish supervised consumption services in Edmonton. Scientific evidence consistently supports the individual and community benefits of these services, and local data demonstrate an urgent need for them in our inner city.

Opinion: Science should guide local response to substance abuse

There is no safe drug right now in this province': Men disproportionately affected by drug crisis

CBC News BC, October 13, 2017

Helen Jennens' sons Tyler and Rian Jennens are prime examples of the very demographic that has been, and continues to be, the hardest hit by the ongoing fentanyl crisis. The latest numbers from the B.C. Coroners Service show that drug overdoses have killed 1,013 people in the first eight months of 2017. Four out of every five of those deaths were men. Nearly all of them — 90 per cent — occurred indoors.

There is no safe drug right now in this province': Men disproportionately affected by drug crisis

jennens-family.jpg

What happens when a child loses a parent to an overdose

TREVOR JANG | October 12, 2017

Mac watched from across the street in Kelowna, B.C. as an ambulance took his father away. The now 13-year-old knew his dad was dead, he recalls of that day in January 2016, because the ambulance didn’t turn the emergency lights back on. “It’s hard to think about it because I never really got a chance to say goodbye to him,” he says.

Mac’s father, Tyler, overdosed on pure fentanyl. His family believes he thought it was heroin. Mac says he wants to speak out and share his story “because it’s a really big problem in the world and a lot of other people are suffering because of it, because of drugs.”

What happens when a child loses a parent to an overdose

The faces of an opioid crisis

St. Catharine's Standard, September 27, 2017

Heart-wrenching pain and frustration in a system they say failed their children brought five women to Niagara’s public health committee meeting Tuesday.

Each of the women, including Jennifer Johnston, Sandi Walker Tantardini, Wilma Thompson, Ann Minors and Judith Rossman, carried photographs of their adult children who died far too young — falling victim to the opioid crisis that has been sweeping through Canada.

The faces of an opioid crisis

Private member's bill seeks to outlaw possession of pill presses for manufacturing counterfeit drugs

Toronto Sun, September 21, 2017

Leila Attar, an Ontario teenager who nearly died after unknowingly ingesting fentanyl is supporting a private member’s bill which would make it illegal to possess or use a pill press machine to manufacture counterfeit drugs.

Private member's bill seeks to outlaw possession of pill presses for manufacturing counterfeit drugs

Opioid poisonings land 16 Canadians in hospital each day on average, 53% jump over 10 yearsOpioid poisonings land 16 Canadians in hospital each day on average, 53% jump over 10 years

CBC News, September 16, 2017

'Frankly pathetic' record-keeping

"It's frankly pathetic in terms of understanding use and patterns of use," said Elaine Hyshka, an assistant professor at the School of Public Health at the University of Alberta and co-chair of the commission set up by the Alberta government to tackle the crisis.

Opioid poisonings land 16 Canadians in hospital each day on average, 53% jump over 10 years