You never think it’s going to happen to you’: Opioid crisis claiming lives in Alberta suburbs

ELIZABETH CAMERON StarMetro Calgary and OMAR MOSLEH StarMetro Edmonton, April 26, 2018

In Ethan’s case, his mother Evelyn (also a pseudonym) found out about his addiction through his girlfriend.

With treatment, in part at a private detox facility in Alberta, Ethan was able to get off fentanyl. Yet even today, after being in recovery for several months, most of his extended family have no idea what he went through.

Evelyn recently joined Moms Stop The Harm, a Canada-wide advocacy group that, among other concerns, wants to see addiction and drug use destigmatized in the interest of preventing more overdose deaths.

She feels the opioid crisis is shifting how addiction is perceived by society — albeit slowly.

“I think this epidemic has really pushed the envelope in terms of the traditional treatment,” Evelyn said. “It’s a medical condition like other medical conditions. And it needs to be treated that way.”

You never think it’s going to happen to you’: Opioid crisis claiming lives in Alberta suburbs