B.C. families say they’re often prevented from being involved in addiction treatment

Globe and Mail, April 11, 2018

Families with loved ones addicted to illicit drugs struggle to navigate British Columbia’s health-care system and are often prohibited from being involved in care because of privacy and confidentiality policies, says a woman who tried to help her daughter before she died. Deb Bailey said her 21-year-old daughter, Ola Bailey, was found dead in the stairwell of a building in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside in 2015, after overdosing on heroin laced with fentanyl.

Leslie McBain, who advocates for families at the BC Centre on Substance Use, also said it’s time for the government to stop consultations with families and start helping people in desperate need. “How much consultation do we actually need?” said McBain, whose family doctor also excluded her from her 25-year-old son’s care before he died of an overdose of opioids that were prescribed to him for a back injury.

B.C. families say they’re often prevented from being involved in addiction treatment